Boarding and Day · Co-ed College Prep · Grades 6–12 & Postgraduate · Hebron, Maine

Science

The Science Department members share their enthusiasm and interests to spark curiosity and to nurture and develop an interest in science. It is important for students to understand that science is a process for approaching problems and that the approaches used in science may be relevant to other situations in their lives. The department stresses to students how science is an ever-expanding body of knowledge and that ideas and theories are modified as scientists learn more. It is a dynamic field, not a static one!

The department strives to provide students with a solid background in the life and physical sciences to prepare them to deal effectively with science and technology issues related to their everyday lives, to help develop more acute observational skills, as well as to prepare students well for college-level courses.  Each student must complete at least one full-year laboratory course in both life science (biology) and physical science (chemistry or physics).

SCIENCE EXPLORATION (ESL)

This hands-on class will focus on necessary scientific skills such as independent research, technical writing, and the experimental method while giving students a scientific context to learn English. These skills will be taught with content drawn from the three major branches of science: physics, chemistry, and biology. Students will learn to conduct scientific inquiry in English formally and informally through academic written work and oral presentations, through various laboratory experiments, experiences, and fieldwork in the areas of physics, chemistry, biology, and ecology. The overarching theme will be micro to macro as students will learn basic scientific themes behind much of the content they will be exposed to in future courses. The course will strongly emphasize lab and writing skills to reinforce the idea that science is inquiry based and that students must draw conclusions by first generating evidence.

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Anatomy and Physiology is a full-year elective course for those students who have successfully completed their biology and physical science requirements. This is an advanced course on the structure and functions of the human body. Students will gain an understanding of human anatomy and physiology that is geared towards topics and curriculum that students will see within a basic college level course. Topics include the human muscular and skeletal systems, cardiovascular structure and physiology, the respiratory system, digestive system, nervous system, and homeostasis.  Digital media, iPad applications, and presentation skills will be highlighted as well.  Special focus in the areas of sports medicine, human health, athletic injuries, disease, and nutrition as well as hands-on lab work to emphasize each concept.

Prerequisites: one year of Biology

AP BIOLOGY

The most rigorous course in Biology, the Advanced Placement course is designed to allow students to delve deeply into the patterns of structure and function in the living world. A high level of performance in previous Chemistry and Biology courses are a prerequisite for this course, and Physics is recommended, which includes detailed class discussion, extensive laboratory work, and comprehensive tests. The Biology prerequisite may be waived in the case of extraordinarily motivated students. Topics include (1) the processes that underlie evolution, driving biological unity and diversity, (2) the use of free energy in biological metabolic and maintenance processes, (3) biological information systems, and (4) the organization, function, and interactions of biological systems. Students completing the course will take the Advanced Placement examination in Biology in May. Prerequisites: departmental approval.

AP CHEMISTRY

Advanced Placement Chemistry is a second-year chemistry course for highly motivated students. The AP Chemistry course develops topics in atomic structure, periodicity, kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, organic chemistry, thermodynamics and the descriptive chemistry of elements. Special attention is given to solving problems using these concepts. Laboratory work is extensive, including the preparation of various inorganic compounds, qualitative analysis of cations, determination of solubility products and equilibrium constants, potentiometric acid-base titrations and electroplating. A student completing the course will take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Prerequisites: departmental approval.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

The main objectives of AP Environmental Science are to instill an appreciation for, and a deeper understanding of the ecological relationships in our natural world and the impacts humans have on them. Guiding themes include engaging in scientific exploration while developing skills in the field (observation, data collection and interpretation), and exploring the natural world—particularly that of our own Hebron Academy campus. Classroom discussions include environmental issues of Maine, global environmental issues, and the crucial relationship between Environmental Justice and Social Justice. Every student will complete this class with a sense of optimism, urgency and commitment toward wise stewardship of the global environment. Educated properly, students will be able to confront the many environmental problems our world faces and contribute to their ultimate solution in the future. Prerequisites: Honors level grades in Chemistry and Biology and departmental approval.

AP PHYSICS C: MECHANICS

The most rigorous course in physics, AP Physics C is an introduction to calculus-based physics that qualified students may take concurrently with calculus. The course begins with a rigorous treatment of classical mechanics including Newton’s laws, conservation laws, and oscillations.  This course thoroughly prepares students to take the AP Physics C: Mechanics exam in the spring. Introductory topics in electromagnetism may also be covered, including electrostatics and Gauss's Law after the AP exam. Heavy emphasis is placed on working multi-step problems whose solutions require varied techniques. Laboratory work is a major part of this course and is intensive and wide ranging, allowing students the hands-on experience to gain a thorough understanding of the principles being studied. Pre/corequisite: Calculus or above and departmental approval.

The most rigorous course in physics, AP Physics C is an introduction to calculus-based physics that qualified students may take concurrently with calculus. The course begins with a rigorous treatment of classical mechanics including Newton’s laws, conservation laws, and oscillations.  This course thoroughly prepares students to take the AP Physics C: Mechanics exam in the spring. Introductory topics in electromagnetism may also be covered, including electrostatics and Gauss's Law after the AP exam. Heavy emphasis is placed on working multi-step problems whose solutions require varied techniques. Laboratory work is a major part of this course and is intensive and wide ranging, allowing students the hands-on experience to gain a thorough understanding of the principles being studied. Pre/corequisite: Calculus or above and departmental approval.

BIOLOGY

This introductory course, which integrates laboratory exercises and field studies with classroom discussion, emphasizes the continuity of life and the complementary nature of structure and function in the living world. Topics include ecological relationships between organisms, cell structure and function, energy transformation, cell division, genetics, and the structure and function of selected plant and animal physiological systems. This course continues to build upon scientific writing and lab-based skills begun in previous science classes.

BIOLOGY (HONORS)

This introductory course, which integrates laboratory exercises and field studies with classroom discussion, emphasizes the continuity of life and the complementary nature of structure and function in the living world. Topics include ecological relationships between organisms, cell structure and function, energy transformation, cell division, genetics, and the structure and function of selected plant and animal physiological systems. This course continues to build upon scientific writing and lab-based skills begun in previous science classes. Honors Biology explores a similar topic set, but with increased pace, rigor, and expectations of the students. Prerequisite/corequisite: physical science (chemistry or physics).

BIOLOGY: MARINE BIOLOGY & CONSERVATION

In this class, we will study the major principles of biology through the lens of marine life forms. It will be a broad survey in how organisms function physiologically and behaviorally in such environments. In addition we will learn about marine biomes and oceanography in order to examine the ecology of marine organisms. Moreover, we will examine how these systems are faring and protected in this current, extinction age. This will be, in part, a traditional scientific experimentation/methodology class with a focus on content and process as well as focused on skills related to scientific literacy and communication, particularly as it relates to the intersection of science and public policy and social sciences.  Prerequisite/corequisite: physical science (chem or physics), may serve as life science graduation credit or elective.

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry is a full year introductory laboratory course in descriptive chemistry for juniors and seniors. This course presents a thorough study of the fundamental principles of atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding in the three phases of matter, chemical reactions with stoichiometry, energy and the concepts of equilibrium. Classroom lectures and discussions are supplemented with frequent laboratory exercises utilizing experimentation on the micro-scale. The students learn to analyze data and then write reports on their results.

CHEMISTRY (HONORS)

Chemistry is a full year introductory laboratory course in descriptive chemistry for juniors and seniors. This course presents a thorough study of the fundamental principles of atomic structure, periodicity, chemical bonding in the three phases of matter, chemical reactions with stoichiometry, energy and the concepts of equilibrium. Classroom lectures and discussions are supplemented with frequent laboratory exercises utilizing experimentation on the micro-scale. The students learn to analyze data and then write reports on their results. The honors level of this course maintains very similar themes but adds greater depth to the above topics as well as a stronger focus on the mathematical components of Chemistry.

CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS

Students will take a course in Conceptual Physics during their 9th grade year at Hebron. This class will focus on necessary scientific skills such as independent research, technical writing, scientific method, and experimental design under the umbrella of physical laws such as motion, force, work, and energy. Moreover students will learn principles of design and engineering by solving problems related to the motion of objects. Students in this course will be required to complete several collaborative projects in which they will design their own experiments, collect data, and present their major findings both in writing and through presentation. In this way, teachers of this course will strongly emphasize lab and writing skills to reinforce the idea that science is inquiry based and that students must always draw conclusions by first generating evidence. This course is meant to provide students the backbone skill set that will help them be more successful as they move into upper-level science coursework.

HEALTH, WELLNESS, AND MINDFULNESS

The Health, Wellness, and Mindfulness course will provide current students with a global awareness of personal and community health education. Each student will gain a better understanding of human biology, biochemistry, disease, mental health, nutrition, medical treatments as well as the development aspects of children and young adults. An eclectic approach to the curriculum will provide each student with hands-on applications and understanding of the variety of topics within this course. Research, presentations, laboratory exercises, group discussions, and a variety of technology techniques will be used to highlight each topic.

PHYSICS

Physics requires students learn to apply principles to problems encountered in everyday life and to perform laboratory exercises to gain hands-on experience with these principles. We use iPads and our Pasco sensor system to make detailed measurements of phenomena in laboratory experiments. We will also make use of the Hebron telescope to make detailed observations of the night sky. Topics explored in this class include classical mechanics, astronomy, cosmology, electricity and magnetism, and optics. Prerequisite/corequisite: Algebra II.

PRINCIPLES OF ENGINEERING

The Principles of Engineering class is the second class in Hebron’s EDIE (Engineering, Design, Innovation, Entrepreneurship) Pathway. In Principles of Engineering students build on the skills they gained in E1 as they encounter more engineering-specific topics that they might study in a postsecondary engineering course. The major units of this class are Energy and Power, Materials and Structures, Control Systems, and Statistics and Kinematics. Students develop their skills and understanding of concepts through activity, project, and problem-based learning. Throughout this course, students will also gain the knowledge and skills to use high-end technical machines including our materials tester, laser cutters, CNC router, and different 3D printers. Students will continuously document their work in engineering notebooks and practice communicating their solutions to their peers and members of the greater community. This class also helps students to develop strategies to direct their own learning in and out of the classroom. Prerequisite: Successful completion of one of Hebron’s E1 classes and Algebra 1.